Demi Moore's Nude Scandal

December 4, 2007, 10:22 amnewideanz

When Ashton Kutcher lost his mobile phone overseas, little did he expect the private erotic pictures of his wife Demi Moore to go public

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Ashton Kutcher are facing every celebrity's worst nightmare after naked pictures of the actress have fallen into the wrong hands.

Ashton's mobile phone, which contained nude images of his 44-year-old wife, went missing months ago, and now the man who found it is selling the images for $1.3 million. In some of the 35 pictures, Demi is apparently sprawled naked on a bed with her lower back propped up by a pillow. In another she is lying in bed wearing a sexy black bra reading a script. There are also photos that the Punk'd host took of himself, half-naked.

Ashton, 29, lost his phone in April when he and Demi were in Valencia, Spain, for the America's Cup.

'The guy said he found the phone in the back of a cab and took it home with him,' an insider says. 'He tried to find out who owned it by going through its memory - and that's when he found the pictures.

Another source says, 'When Demi and Ashton got word that someone had their racy pictures they freaked out. Not only are they embarrassed, they're angry.'

Knowing the opportunist is trying to profit from the pictures will only increase their rage. The phone also has celebrity telephone numbers.

'People started calling the phone, asking for Ashton,' the source says. 'Ashton decided to ring it. He demanded that the guy give it back but the man switched the phone off.

'The man wants a million dollars for the pictures,' the source says. 'The photo agencies here all know one another and word's got out that since April he has hawked the pictures to a few places.'

The incident has a touch of deja vu for Demi. Pornographic pictures of the star taken in the early '80s appeared in a 1983 German edition of Playboy. Bruce Willis bought the pictures shortly after his 1987 wedding to Demi, to prevent them from being published again.

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